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Digging up our Past

Archaeology

Dig this: Archaeology Month at natural history museum

The Cape Cod Museum of Natural History in Brewster celebrates Massachusetts Archaeology Month in October with a series of educational events. On Wednesdays to Sundays Oct. 4 to 27, the museum is offering Pottery Reconstruction from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Free with museum admission, visitors can sift through soil to find pottery sherds and try their hand at putting them back together. A Taylor Bray Farm Update is set for Saturday, Oct. 7, 1 p.m. The 2016 field season at the farm investigated the area around the ca. 1640 Richard Taylor house that was discovered back in 2012. In …

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EXCLUSIVE: New Archaeology Shows ‘Refugee Camp,’ Not Just Rebels, Atop Masada

Tour guides leading thousands of visitors to Masada each year follow a similar routine: Where Roman troops breached the walls, they retell Josephus Flavius’s account of how a group of obsessive, fanatical Jewish rebels refused to concede to servitude or slaughter, and committed suicide instead. For decades, archaeology at the site has been calling the story of the suicide, so central to Israel’s national myth, into question. Now new discoveries may force a revision of the notion that the group atop the fort was much more diverse than the heroic band of brigands celebrated by the cherished story. “We’re actually …

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MTU Archaeology program celebrates 25th anniversary

Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Follow @WJMN_Local3 Like Local 3 News on Facebook: HANCOCK – The Industrial Heritage and Archaeology program celebrates its 25th anniversary with joint celebration with Keweenaw National Historical Park. “Choices from the past impact how we make decisions now and how we will in the future,” says Sarah Scarlett, assistant professor of history. “We are equipping students today to think critically about the way that humans interact with the environment, both natural and built, and how science and engineering research and decisions in …

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New Dates Push Back Use of Zero

OXFORD, ENGLAND—The Guardian reports that new radiocarbon dates have been obtained for the Bakhshali manuscript, which was written in an ancient form of Sanskrit on 70 pieces of birch bark, by members of the Heritage Science team at the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries. The text, discovered in 1881 in a village located in what is now Pakistan, is thought to have been a training manual complete with practice arithmetic problems for merchants trading on the Silk Road, and is known for its use of a dot to represent the concept of zero. The new dates indicate the oldest pieces …

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Fort McCoy archaeology aids understanding of Wisconsin’s distant past

Fort McCoy is part of the Driftless Area, also called the Paleozoic Plateau, which escaped glaciation in the last Ice Age, some 11,700-plus years ago. Combine the location with archaeological work done at Fort McCoy for more than three decades and a greater understanding of early human life in the region and the state is unfolding as more research is done, said Alexander Woods, Ph.D., an archaeologist with Colorado State University’s (CSU) Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands under contract with Fort McCoy. “Archaeology (on post) has helped the state of Wisconsin better understand the Driftless Area because the …

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Industrial Heritage and Archaeology Program Turns 25

The Industrial Heritage and Archaeology program celebrates its 25th anniversary with a joint celebration with Keweenaw National Historical Park. There are museums and entire academic fields dedicated to the study of the human past. Whether the alabaster stone of Roman ruins or the moveable type of the printing press, humans as a species have memorialized many aspects of our history. But what about our recent history? What of the history of the paper mill, the logging camp, the range light? The study of human use of technology and creation of industry is a specialized field, and there are only a …

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Navy’s Underwater Archaeology Branch seeks to identify submerged aircraft

On March 18, 1945 at 2:15 p.m., an XF8F-1 Bearcat sped down the runway and climbed into the sky above Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland. At that moment in time, no one could have imagined the propeller-driven fighter plane disappearing into the distance would become the focus of a naval underwater archaeological investigation more than 70 years later. The Bearcat’s 23-year-old pilot, with Aircraft Armament Test Squadron, had logged 935 flight hours and been awarded the Air Medal the previous June while participating in nine carrier-based operations in the Pacific. With just under seven hours flight time in the …

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Media Archaeology Lab

The Media Archaeology Lab couldn’t have picked a better motto: “The past must be lived so that the present can be seen.” MAL is a digital media research lab that also keeps solid footing in the past by experimenting with, let’s say, less than cutting-edge tech. The lab uses fully functional vintage technology to answer questions about what the future of media might look like. Located at the University of Colorado at Boulder, MAL preserves and maintains all kinds of historically relevant media and technology, from a replica Apple I to the Commodore 64 to the Osborne 1, the world’s …

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Celebrating 25 years of industrial heritage, archaeology

HOUGHTON, CALUMET, Mich. (WLUC) – Keweenaw National Historical Park and Michigan Technological University’s Industrial Heritage and Archaeology Program are both 25 years old this year. To celebrate this milestone, everyone is invited to participate in programs and discussions and attend presentations and special events. Local residents, former students, community members, and visitors to the area are all encouraged to be part of this festive celebration. On Friday evening, September 22, Dr. Krysta Ryzewski will provide a talk titled, Preserving Legendary 20th-century Sites in Detroit: the Role of Archaeology in Post-Industrial Communities. Dr. Ryzewski is the Associate Professor of Archaeology at …

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Archaeology in Action: A new way to teach kids about Island history

The province has published a new activity book to teach the public — especially kids — about archeology and about the history of P.E.I.  The book, Archaeology in Action, was published in July. “It’s kind of a fun little book that anyone of any age can do,” said Helen Kristmanson, the director of Aboriginal affairs and archeology for the province. The province handed out copies of the book to participants of the public archeology dig at the Orwell Corner historic village this summer. Though the book isn’t directly tied to the dig, it was a good opportunity to share the book with the public, …

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