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Tag Archives: When

This Critical Thinker’s Letter to His Daughter Will Restore Your Hope For The Future

There are days when it feels like the world really is going to shit. And when that happens, we need to remember that there’s actually a lot of hope for the future. As one dad recently expressed in an ‘open letter’ to his second-grader daughter, there’s a bright generation growing up right now, and they will be the “smartest, most adaptable to change” people that have lived so far. “Many adults will call your generation lazy, and will verbally ponder whether it will doom the planet. But they are wrong,” writes Stephan Neidenbach, a middle school teacher from Maryland, US. …

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If You Feel Everyone Around You Has More Friends, You’re Probably Wrong

Only recently did I work up the nerve to go to a diner or coffee shop alone. Even now, when I do, I’ll sit there hunched over my sandwich or cup of tea and cast furtive glances at all the twosomes around me, knowing exactly what they’re thinking: What. A. Loser. She can’t even find someone to keep her company for half an hour? On a rational level, I am aware that no one is thinking that – they have got their own problems and a person eating a sandwich alone in New York City isn’t all that attention-grabbing. But my …

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Total Recall: How to Back Up All the Text Messages on Your iPhone

If you’re like most iPhone users, when you upgraded to the newest version of iOS, Apple automatically migrated your settings, apps, and text messages. While there are benefits to wiping your phone and starting over—c’mon, you don’t really need all those apps—there’s also the possibility that you might lose valuable info hidden within your text messages. All those short missives you’ve written are mostly ephemeral, but some of them can be important, especially if you need them as proof in a dispute. Even if you just want to save your priceless nuggets of wit, you should be able to. Apple—frustratingly—offers …

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The Ghosts of Providence

By Tony Pacitti It was a humid, drizzly night when I joined the Providence Ghost Tour for a haunted jaunt through the East Side. The weather was fitting for an evening of ghost stories, though I’ll concede that I wasn’t a believer when I pulled up to Prospect Terrace for the tour – far from it. I’ve never had any use for the supernatural. Sometimes the mind runs away with itself, filling in the unexplained gaps with notions of hidden forces, destiny, fate and campfire chicanery. So says I, the educated, science-minded modern man who knows that ghosts are nothing but …

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Why Math Is the Best Way to Make Sense of the World

When Rebecca Goldin spoke to a recent class of incoming freshmen at George Mason University, she relayed a disheartening statistic: According to a recent study, 36 percent of college students don’t significantly improve in critical thinking during their four-year tenure. “These students had trouble distinguishing fact from opinion, and cause from correlation,” Goldin explained. She went on to offer some advice: “Take more math and science than is required. And take it seriously.” Why? Because “I can think of no better tool than quantitative thinking to process the information that is thrown at me.” Take, for example, the study she …

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I Went on Darren Aronofsky’s Strange mother! Scavenger Hunt

Last Saturday I did something nearly everyone does when their friend goes to the bathroom at a bar: I checked Twitter. There, amidst the Hurricane Irma updates and breathless discussion about Hillary Clinton’s new book, was a very simple message from Darren Aronofsky. After spending a few seconds to try and remember when I actually started following the Black Swan director (inconclusive), I realized what his message was saying: “now #nyc #scavengerhunt” next to an image of Jennifer Lawrence from his upcoming movie mother! and a New York telephone number. My friend returned from the bathroom and I showed her …

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An 8-Year-Old Bullied For Her Love of Bugs Just Got Her First Scientific Publication

It’s tough being different – especially when you’re an 8-year-old who absolutely loves bugs and brings them to school as friends. Sophia Spencer’s fascination with insects didn’t go down well with her peers until a crowd of professional entomologists stepped in for support. Now she has just become the proud junior author of a paper in a scientific journal. It all started last year when Sophia’s mum Nicole reached out to the Entomological Society of Canada (ESC), looking for advice on how to encourage her daughter’s interest in the field of insect study despite teasing by other kids. “She is …

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Polaroid’s OneStep2 Is a Vintage Camera for the Digital Age

When Polaroid released the OneStep camera in 1977, the company described it as the “simplest camera in the world.” It had a fixed focus lens and automatic roller mechanism that spit out film that developed in minutes. The OneStep was certainly simpler—and cheaper—than the SX-70, a foldable, leather-bound instant film camera that Polaroid released five years prior with a $180 price tag (just over $1,000 in today’s money). The OneStep, which sold for just $40, was the company’s first true point-and-shoot camera; a one-button gadget that even the most stubborn luddite could figure out. It was designed to be durable, …

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The Ghosts and History of Cargin Castle Part I

When we began our journey to Ireland, I chose to stay at Carraigin (as it is listed on VRBO) Castle because it was beautiful and had plenty of space for my family to spread out into.  I would be lying if I wasn’t also beguiled by the idea of Tina, the woman who brings full Irish breakfasts and dinners to the castle at our request.  I dug through the internet and found no records of any tragedies occurring at this castle and there were no ghost stories that I could find.  This didn’t bother me much since I knew I …

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Where Horror Gets the Red Carpet Treatment

It’s a far cry from 20 years ago, when Mr. Geddes, a voluble fellow in ever-present red pants, switched from Midnight Madness fan to employee. He set out to argue on behalf of films like “The Host,” whose genre trappings he felt had automatically consigned them to second-class status. Mr. Geddes’s tenure here figures into any number of origin stories. There’s the time he fished out a screener of Eli Roth’s “Cabin Fever” from the festival’s rejection pile. And the time he ignored the response that “Saw” received at the industry-heavy Sundance Film Festival and put it in front of …

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